Targeting Language Support for Non-Native English-Speaking Graduate Students at a Canadian University

  • Liying Cheng
  • Johanna Myles
  • Andy Curtis
Keywords: Language education

Abstract

Universities and colleges in Canada and other English-speaking countries have become increasingly concerned with linguistic and cultural diversity and internationalizing their campuses, both to enhance local and international students' experiences on campus and to prepare them to function in their careers and the larger society. Most international students are non-native English-speaking (NNES) and need support to develop the English language proficiency required for engagement in the academic demands of the Canadian university milieu. This small-scale study at a Canadian university, by way of a survey and follow-up interview, addresses the gap in our understanding between academic skills that are required at the graduate level and those that learners of English find difficult. The findings suggest that by targeting academic skills that are both required and difficult, efficiency can be achieved in the design of programmatic supports for developing English for academic purposes (EAP). The findings further suggest that international students may lack independent strategies for advancing their English-language proficiency and that these too can be targeted in an EAP program.
Published
2004-06-12
How to Cite
Cheng, L., Myles, J., & Curtis, A. (2004). Targeting Language Support for Non-Native English-Speaking Graduate Students at a Canadian University. TESL Canada Journal, 21(2), 50 - 71. https://doi.org/10.18806/tesl.v21i2.174
Section
Articles